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Talks and Posters Presented by ERCI Consultants



Northwest Anthropological Conference 2016 - Abstracts

More than just "It's the Law".

This talk is for people working in Cultural Resource Management who want to go from good to great, who want to be part of a science- and ethics-based business, who want to wake up every morning excited about what they do. Do you spend even part of your time justifying your work to hostile or ambivalent clients or land owners and wish you could say more than “because you are required to?” If you want to make sure that cultural deposits, features, objects and buildings have a chance to get older because you and your clients protected them, then step right up. Consider the thousand small moments that through insight and hard work you line up in the right direction to inspire people to protect something that they might not have known existed. Help your clients to get excited about your work and be happy when they write that check. This paper is about finding ways to get agencies, clients, taxpayers—anyone—excited about heritage preservation, and for everyone who wants to take action every day to make this industry better.


Kelly R. Bush, M.A.


Risk Management Tools.

Come hear about the tactics for risk reduction that we have been implementing on projects, large and small, in Northern Puget Sound—ideas developed in planning and used in the field, how they worked, what we would change, and how to identify opportunities and synergies. We work with a wide range of stakeholders and listen to tribes and agencies to understand what are their critical issues. In particular, project engineers and project managers know their projects better than anyone; we have had real success asking for what we need and then listening to the great ideas they come up with, and most importantly working with them on implementation to avoid, minimize or mitigate the impact to cultural resources. This talk will provide concrete examples of what we have tried and why. We can show you how vetting great plans and getting everyone in the room saves money and resources. There is no reason not to do it, and frankly if we want to stay relevant and funded we had better work harder at becoming great, flexible, cutting-edge risk-takers and risk managers.


Kelly R. Bush, M.A.


Mermaid Tears and Midden: A Possible Protohistoric Artifact from 45SJ50.

Site 45SJ50 is a culture rich shell midden located on a headland at the north end of Roche Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington. Historically the landform was used as the site of the Roche Harbor Lime Company Staveless Barrel Factory, and more recently it has been the location of a private residence. Field research beginning in the spring of 2015 allowed for the collection of midden samples that were radiocarbon dated to between 3459 ± 30 B.P. and 2595 ± 30 B.P. With dates that place this site in the Locarno Beach phase, it was quite interesting to find what appears to be a modified fragment of glass, which had subsequently been rolled in the beach splash zone among many other pieces of possible historic glass. Such an artifact provides a unique perspective into the possible protohistoric occupation of the area.

Ian R. Lewis, M.A.


Landscape Modification and the Importance of Historic Research in CRM.

Human modification to the landscape has been occurring throughout human occupation, and continues into the historic period, where the scope and magnitude of this modification has intensified. This poster explores through specific examples the importance of identifying historic modifications to the landscape before engaging in fieldwork, and the ways in which this knowledge can inform and alter the interpretation of both historic and precontact deposits. Examples for this poster are taken directly from data gathered during mitigative CRM projects on Whidbey Island in Washington State, and explore the impact of factors such as the development of public infrastructure, wetland reclamation, and recreation on the precontact and historic record.

 

Sarah Johnson-Humphries, M.A. and Michelle N. North, B.A.



Northwest Anthropological Conference 2015 - Abstracts

By the People, for the People: Designing Archaeology Outreach Programs with Local Governments.


Public outreach and education are critical to the work of archaeologists. Through outreach we can inspire our clients to act as good stewards for cultural resources, find new support for the protection of archaeological sites, unify communities, empower people, explore identity and perspective, expose people to new worldviews and much more. Archaeological outreach includes providing guidance to our local government clients on how they can best keep the people they serve informed. Over the past four years, Equinox Research and Consulting (ERCI) has worked extensively for and with the City of Oak Harbor in Washington. ERCI has had the opportunity to try out a variety of public education tactics and has worked with the City as they have provided archaeological outreach. Using the tried successes and failures in Oak Harbor, this talk will discuss how to design an archaeological public outreach program with a local government. 
 

Julia M. Rowland, M.A.


Message in Bottles: Analysis and Interpretation of Site 45WH1001, Woodstock Farm Bottle Dump, Whatcom County, Washington.

To most people, a bunch of bottles in the dirt is simply that, a bunch of bottles. Trash. Perhaps recycling. But mainly useless trash. Even as archaeologist, we recognize such objects as trash, yet the difference is we do not see this trash as useless. Site 45WH1001, a historic bottle dump dating to the early 1900s, was inadvertently discovered winter 2014 by sewer utility trenching within the Woodstock Farm Campus in Whatcom County, Washington. Much historic and archival information is available regarding the occupants of Woodstock Farm, but the message contained in these bottles provides even more insight into one of the most fascinating and influential founding families of Whatcom County.


Ian R, Lewis, M.A.

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Learning to Shave: Experimental Archaeology of Antler Debitage.

Antler, due to its dense nature was used for a variety of tools, ranging from points and pressure flakers to wedges and handles. Many archaeologist recognize the characteristic marks left on antler as a result of adzing to reduce antler beams into manageable pieces and blanks. Similar to bone, antler can sometimes even be flaked and fractured, though not as easily as stone. However, not much notice has been given to antler shavings in the archaeological record. There are three types of antler shavings, or curls. The goal of this experimental archaeology was to test whether or not the three types of antler shavings are produced sequentially, possibly similar to the primary, secondary and tertiary flakes of the lithic reduction sequence.


Ian R, Lewis, M.A.

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Wind, Waves, and a Hidden Spit: A Case Study from 45IS298 on Whidbey Island, WA.

Shell midden sites rich in cultural importance and material found along shorelines are effected by coastal processes that exist in conjunction with the landforms they are built upon. The presentation is a case study of a shell midden matrix identified during salvage work during the City of Oak Harbor 42 Inch Storm Water Outfall Project on Whidbey Island in Oak Harbor, WA. The matrix had been heavily effected by erosional processes and storm events prior to becoming covered with modern fill, which effectively hid this portion of the site and the land form it exists on, until its excavation in 2014.


Michelle N. North, B.A.

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Outreach in Oak Harbor

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Northwest Anthropological Conference 2014

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Connecting with Communities: Putting Community Archaeology into Practice in Skagit County, Washington.


From 1897 to 1907 the Equality Colony, a socialist utopia, attempted to unite socialists from across the nation and to convert the U.S. by providing a practical demonstration of prosperity under socialism.  The colony played a fascinating part in the formation of Washington State and has great potential to contribute to the archaeological record.  The land that hosted the Equality Colony is privately owned by 35 different parties creating a challenging contest for archaeological survey.  My goals in this project were to share my knowledge about Equality with the local community, to learn what interest in and information about the Colony they had, and to address people's concerns about archaeology.  I attended local history events, gave talks, held meetings, and sent out numerous rounds of postcards. In this paper I will examine the methods used; both triumphs and setbacks with be discussed.  This project has inspired and contributed to conversations about heritage, archaeology, history and conservation in this community. 
 

Julia M. Rowland, M.A.

Northwest Anthropological Conference 2013

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Northwest Anthropological Conference 2012- Abstracts

Consultation Success on a Small but Fascinating Project in the Northern Puget Sound Foothills.


In the past five years, habitat enhancement and mitigation projects have become a strong element in the industry of cultural resource management.  Often wetland projects by their nature are within areas of high probability for cultural resources.  We will be discussing the elements of the recently completed Centennial Trail North End Trailhead Park Project.  Ultimately, consultation was the big success on this project but the resources we managed, the landscape they are set in and the methods we used to investigate them are their own compelling story that we will share. 
 

Kelly R. Bush, M.A., Julia M. Rowland, B.A., and Lindsey E. Koehler, M.S.

Fisher Slough Habitat Restoration – Lessons Learned

 

In the past five years, habitat restoration has become a strong element in the industry of cultural resource management.  Salmon habitat restoration projects by their nature are often within areas of high probability for cultural resources. Levee breeches and removals are often part of habitat restoration plans and have proven to be complex cultural features to manage or protect.  I will be discussing the elements of the recently completed (2010 and 2011 field seasons) Fisher Slough Freshwater Marsh Restoration Project, including the importance of understanding the taphonomy and the nature and character of these types of features and archaeological material.  These results should be considered when planning the initial identification and evaluation on salmon habitat restoration projects, especially those that involve modifications to existing levees. 

 

Kelly R. Bush, M.A.

Northwest Anthropological Conference 2010

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Hozomeen Gathering 2009

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Northwest Anthropological Conference 2009

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SAA Annual Meeting 2008

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